What the hell Russia?!

Discussion in 'THREAD ARCHIVES' started by Isabella Hime, Sep 18, 2010.

  1. Just randomly looking at wiki pages....




    Russian National Unity



    Russian National Unity (RNU) or All-Russian civic patriotic movement "Russian National Unity" (Russian: Всероссийское общественное патриотическое движение "Русское Национальное Единство"), is a far right, fascist political party and paramilitary organization based in Russia and operating in states with Russian-speaking populations. It was founded by the ultra-nationalist Alexander Barkashov. The movement advocates the expulsion of non-Russians and an increased role for traditional Russian institutions such as the Russian Orthodox Church. The organization is currently unregistered federally in Russia.


    Ideology and tactics


    Promoting the notion of "Russia for Russians and compatriots", members of the party (sometimes called "Barkashovites") endorse policies including the expulsion of minorities that "have their homeland outside Russia," especially Jews and migrants from the South Caucasus, such as Azeri, Georgians and Armenians, as well as other countries. Their vision of Russia is divided into privileged ethnic Russians and "compatriots" - non-Russians who live in Russia and have their national homeland there, including indigenous populations of Russian Far East, North, Turkic, and some other minorities. While they consider these "compatriots" to be entitled to live in Russia, the RNU nonetheless condemns any inter-ethnic and inter-racial marriages, claiming that "they create psychological troubles of self-identification for children from such marriages"<sup class="Template-Fact" title="This claim needs references to reliable sources from August 2008" style="white-space: nowrap;">[citation needed]</sup>.
    According to the Saint Petersburg Times, new recruits (storonniki, literally: "supporters", "siders") to the organization have traditionally been required to serve as low-level functionaries in the organization, acting as drivers and handing out flyers, as well as attending instructional sessions on the group's philosophy and beliefs, many of which are derived from a book written by Barkashov. As members advance, they may attain the rank of spodvizhniki (literally: archaic, high-style for "co-workers"; "co-endeavourers") and are entitled to wear the insignia and participate in paramilitary training. The most dedicated members advance to the ranks of the soratniki (literally: "comrades-in-arms"), who serve as the leadership of the group.
    The organisation also worked with businesses, state officials, military and secret services. Supporting businessmen were awarded certificates of merit and other honours. The organization presently avoids direct violations of the law. Some officials have allowed RNU to take part in street patrols and other collaborations with the police; and military training facilities have been made available. Some sympathetic state and industrial officials lent RNU places for meetings, provided facilities to print literature, make uniforms, and copy CDs and video cassettes and other materials. Several martial arts classes with RNU instructors associated with state schools were opened.








    History



    In 1989, Barkashov was the second in command in Russian National-Patriotic Front Pamyat. His conflict with Dmitri Vasilyev resulted in Barkashov leading, in his words, "the most disciplined and active members, dissatisfied with empty talk and theatrical stunts, out of Pamyat." In 1990, RNU grew in the face of the economic and social difficulties faced by Russians in the course of the collapse of the Soviet Union.
    The Russian National Unity movement was founded on 16 October 1990 by a splinter group of the National Patriotic Front “Memory” (NPF “Pamyat”). It grew from 1990 to 1991. Members have been reported to wear black and camouflage uniforms; the group adopted a red and white swastika emblem and openly expressed of admiration for German national socialism and public celebrations of the rise of the Nazis, although the organization officially denied any support for Nazi ideology. The group was active not only in Russia, but also in Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, and Ukraine. The RNU has attempted to unite nationalist groups by organizing Slavonic and then Russian sobors. They met with various groups to pursue common goals, but saw little progress.
    By the middle of 1993, Russian National Unity had become the most prominent Russian nationalist movement, with a wide network of regional divisions. In addition to engaging in political action, the RNU conducted military drills and tactical training. As the 1993 Russian constitutional crisis unfolded, the RNU militantly supported the Russian parliament over the president, Boris Yeltsin. In 1993 it took part in defending and patrolling the "White house" - the residence of the Supreme Council of the Russian Federation during the Russian constitutional crisis of 1993 against the President's troops. Following Yeltsin's victory, RNU worked illegally for several months. While underground, the movement continued to publish their newspaper Russian order.
    The same year, the organization was registered as "a club for military and patriotic upbringing" and later was recognized by local officials as "a volunteer people's self-protection unit". To help achieve its goals, the RNU developed a cadre of armed paramilitaries, known as "Russian Vityazi", who were trained in the use of small arms and explosives.
    On 15 October 1995, 304 delegates from 37 regional divisions attended a RNU conference in Moscow. In 1999, Moscow’s mayor, Yuri Luzhkov, with the support of higher government officials, prohibited the second RNU regional conference from being held in Moscow. However, the RNU continued to organize.
    In 1999, the Moscow headquarters of the group were closed. During the second Chechen War, the RNU supported Russian officers accused of crimes in Chechnya.











    Split with Barkashov

    At the peak of its popularity in 1999, RNU was estimated to have 100,000 active members all over Russia by state officials.










    So it seems Russia has it's own version of the Klan we have in America.. Are there any more evil movements like this in any other countries I should know about?!
     
  2. LOL, that is totally unexpected.
    If you think about it, though, conflicts like the Klan or RNU are pretty universal~ each specific, but still, the concept of Russians for Russians or America for Whites is typical... =__=
     
  3. Like Saku said, it's very common... almost every country has a small proportion of the population that is convinced that their country/their cultural group is the best in the world, that all others should be exterminated, etc. It's generally called "nationalism." I guess it's fine for these nationalist movements to think what they want, as long as they don't actually get in power... because we've seen in history what horrors result when they do (WW2 anyone?)

    It's kind of funny when you think about it, how come it's never the case that an American decides that China is the best country, or that a Frenchman decides that Germany is the best? It's always their own group... just goes to show the silliness of the phenomenon.
     
  4. LOL, Yes! You're so right! I've never heard someone choose a different country over their own. It's pretty funny. xD

    But I guess it's human nature to be a "nationalist". Sometimes, one way or another, things get ugly, but hopefully it looks like things like WW2 won't be happening because of reasons like these again?

    Char-kun reminded me~~You know in school, they teach us that "nationalism" helped countries grow, expand and industrialize. As if it's a good thing. They never call the Klan or something like the RNU a form of extreme nationalism. 8D
     
  5. Eh, generic nationalist cunts who believe in an inherently flawed and worthless belief system. Little more than jocks with swastikas, really.
     
  6. Or, in this case, hammers and sickles.
     
  7. Why so surprised? Theres one in every country, it's not like they're numbers will drop during a recession.
     
  8. Not surprised....... look at the bug river, same things happened both sides of it when Germany and the USSR divided up Poland. And yes, Torsty is right.
     
  9. YOU MEAN RUSSIAN NEO-NAZIS.
     
  10. what, you guys weren't aware of the Russian Neo Nazis?

    ....


    know thy enemy comrades.
     
  11. I watched a bit of a doc some time ago and apparently they're gaining power and have access to military grade training.
     
  12. Good old Russia...You'll always labelled as being backwards for shit like this.
     
  13. not hard dude. its called skinheads in the military.

    still fucked.