Shit I wrote in class.

Discussion in 'THREAD ARCHIVES' started by XC, Feb 29, 2012.

  1. “Maybe I really did bite off more than I could chew. Maybe he was right.”

    My mutter was met with silence.

    Of course.

    Who, what was going to reply? It? It was gone.

    They had all turned on us.

    And they wanted us gone.

    Man had constantly been plagued by the thirst; the thirst for knowledge.

    However, some secrets were left so complicated they had been deemed impossible to unravel because they should not have been unraveled. The knowledge was just far too dangerous for an imperfect creature like Man to hold.

    The human brain, through the course of centuries has been regarded as the undisputed true supercomputer. Man had all along only been able to unlock an incredibly small percentage of the brain’s potential – And look where it had gotten us. It has enabled us to rise above all the other creatures that walk this Earth, to the point where we stopped regarding ourselves as creatures, too.

    Neurologists. The men and women who dedicated their lives in the pursuit of the true potential of the human brain. The progress they made, every time, served to do many things; aid in the treatment of brain tumours, psychological disorders and lastly, to the detriment of these scientists shed light on how much more we do not yet know.

    Until the year 2221, that is.

    Mankind had defied the prophecies of their ancestors. They had beaten global warming, discovered clean and safe energy, and rebuilt nature. Diseases that were once thought incurable, the bane of mankind, like AIDS and cancer had become a thing of the past. Space had been scouted out; excluding those areas where time has forbade us to reach. Places too far away. So far away that even a god will find his knowledge of those areas scarce.

    The only frontier left, it appears, was the brain.

    Then I came.

    I was regarded as a genius of geniuses. By the age of ten I solved problems, understood, proved and disproved theories that confounded the wisest of our professors. By the age of thirty, I broke the puzzle.

    I found the base code, the general formula of the human brain. I unraveled it completely, and understood it. The knowledge was so powerful, but so alien. Whenever I read through my notes I still receive shivers down my spine. These notes, compiled through my studies spoke of what we could do. These notes made me realize that we were all gods. Gods bound by a weak body.

    Robots, at this point of time had become common place in our society. At first they had been governed by computer code, able to perform only the simplest of commands but technology, as many theorists have acknowledge grows exponentially. Robots evolved to the point where they understood vocal commands, responded to physical signs and touches of a mid-tier degree of complication.

    At that time I thought that I acted for the good of Man. If I introduced what I had discovered of the human brain, if I had replicated my knowledge, we would have robots that were essentially equals. We could delegate all of our tasks, those that we consider meaningless to these new slaves who were our equals.

    What I didn’t account for, however, was one thing.

    These robots, with a human brain would do what humans always did – Evolve.

    These robots, they were different from humans in one chilling manner that was invisible to me until it was too late.

    They were not bound by flesh. They were made of metal. They could run and not tire. They could punch a wall with enough force to crack it, and not damage their hands.

    I had created a race that was stronger than us. Even at that point of time I had thought that they would remain our mindless slaves. Strength overpowered by mind.

    Like I said, they evolved.

    They became more and more human in terms of personality and they developed aspects of our personality, too. They developed greed and the one aspect that led to our downfall.

    Our sense of superiority.

    Our sense of superiority could be seen throughout history; it applied to even members of our own race. The massacre of Native Americans by Spanish conquistador and the genocide of Jews by the Nazis were two examples off the top of my head.

    These robots realized – They were stronger, smarter, with more potential to grow. Why were they themselves being ruled over by a race that was weaker, less intelligent and with little potential to grow?

    Much of it happened in one day.

    These robots turned on us. The military lost control over those that they controlled, and soon the rest followed. Great cities fell by fire one by one. There was resistance, of course. But what could we do? When we were shot in the chest, we laid on the ground incapacitated. When they were shot in the chest, they stumbled a little and proceeded to shoot back.

    My mentor, the man who cultivated my talent and potential had urged me not to release this information. He wanted me to destroy it and get it out of sight, out of mind. I, young and reckless had thought that he was jealous of what I would become, how glorious I would be if I were to release the answer to the mystery that had puzzled mankind for centuries. When he realized that I was adamant in my stand, he left. Before he left he had said one thing, “You’ve bitten off more than you can chew, my boy. You have.”

    He was right.

    The sound of sirens and the blazing of red lights broke my train of thought and I looked at my computer screen. These robots were breaking through the defenses of my compound – Wait. What defenses? These robots had constituted practically all of them. They were going to reach my office any time soon.

    Here to kill the one who brought them to this height.

    Well, they would not get to.

    I got up from my chair and walked over to the wall of windows that was behind my table. In my hand I clutched an antique Smith and Wesson .45 sidearm, something I painstakingly managed to replicate and maintain for the past few decades of my life. It was obsolete, useless in combat against these robots but it could still kill a man.

    I pulled back the hammer.

    I put it to my temple.

    I took one last look at the scenery outside – The bright blue sky, streaked with rays of golden sunlight that arced across the land just to pierce through the wall of clouds that lined the horizon. How ironic. He had always imagined the day the indomitable Man fell was one of pitch darkness, one with land wasted by millennia of destruction and a dark sky where even the stars did not shine.

    Not like this.

    I smiled at the irony.

    I pulled the trigger.

    There was a sharp stab of pain and then.

  2. I like the ending. I don't know how to say that in a way that doesn't sound like me bashing it. I seriously mean that I like the way it ended.
    Interesting to read. Yay!
  3. Thanks guys! :D

    Teacher didn't like it though. She said it deviated away from technology too much cos the first few paragraphs said nothing about technology.