Making your world stand out from the rest

Discussion in 'THREAD ARCHIVES' started by AwesomenessKON, Sep 10, 2015.

  1. Want to build a world from scratch but don't know where to start? Here are a few methods starting with...

    The Microscopic Approach:
    In many respects, this is the opposite of the macroscopic method. In this approach, the GM starts with the dungeon, town, or similar focused settings, and works their way outward. For example, If you have a great idea for a town set on a volcanic mountain, your next step in zooming out would be to create a kingdom or region with a volcanic mountain in it, followed by the continent that surrounds the kingdom, and so on. Many campaigns are built by happenstance as fledgling GMs begin to place farther and farther from the PCs' base of operation or starting point.

    This method for world building applies when you have a fragment of a world--a small province, town, or dungeon--already prepared, and you're trying to flesh out this one dimensional construct into a living, breathing campaign world. Starting small and working up is a natural progression as the PCs grow more powerful and begin to exert their GMs who wants to watch PCs explore the world a little bit at a time--in a system, discovering what lies on the other side of the hill in an important part of the world growth and campaign adventure.
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  2. The Sociological Approach
    If you have an interesting idea for a society or culture, you may want to start here. Building an Oriental or Arabian campaign, or one based around nomadic horsemen, seafaring traders, or some other cultural group, is a popular method for world building. Mapping out the entire world and detailing particular sites or dungeons aren't your concerns at first; you want to create a living society for your PCs to interact in. After you have the society described to your satisfaction, you can go on the describe the world it lives in, or the adventure sites you expect your PCs to visit.

    For this approach, begin with the Kingdom and Society building up the cultural setting for a campaign. Then proceed to detail specific sites in the kingdom along with the history and mythology. After you be detailed the society and kingdom it occupies, you can take a step back and handle the planetology and geology respectively.
  3. These are awesome! I'd love to find some more for this.. o3o