[Sign-ups] Xeria [Dice-Based RP]

Discussion in 'ROLEPLAY GRAVEYARD' started by Protagonist, Feb 23, 2015.

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  1. The Setting:
    https://www.iwakuroleplay.com/threads/the-world-of-xeria.92451/

    The System:
    System (open)


    How the RP works is that your character has several "base stats". They are:

    -Stamina (Max HP for your character. Or rather, every stamina point gives you 10 more HP. "Minor" enemies usually only get 5 for each point)
    -Willpower (Max MP + 10 for each point)
    -Strength
    -Perception
    -Agility
    -Stealth
    -Dexterity
    -Intelligence
    -Charisma

    You start out with 50 points (not sure if I'll keep that number, I might make it a little higher) to distribute among all of these stats (no stat can be lower than 1). In general, 5 is what an "average" (untrained) human is capable of. How many points is how many sides (plus one) your die has when that stat is rolled.
    For example, if you have an agility stat of 1, you basically flip a coin anytime agility is an issue. If it lands on 0, you can't move at all. If it lands on 1, you budge about a foot or so. If you have a speed stat of 5, you roll a six-sided die, which can land on anything from 0 to 5.

    As for combat: Each type of combat chooses one stat to be a "speed stat", another to be its "damage stat", and a third to be its "special stat" (which is basically a "magic attack"-type deal. It's also useful for more passive abilities).

    -Melee: This is everything from swordfighting to punching things. (Speed Stat: Agility, Damage Stat: Strength, Special Stat: Dexterity)
    -Magic: Spellcasting. (Speed Stat: Dexterity, Damage Stat: Intelligence, Special Stat: Perception)
    -Munitions: Ranged Weapons, including guns and bows. (Speed Stat: Perception, Damage Stat: Dexterity, Special Stat: Intelligence)
    -Monsters: Summoning creatures to aid us. Basically, this world's equivalent of a pokemon trainer. (I haven't worked out stats for this one yet.)

    When two opponents attack each other, each round you roll their speed stats against each other. For example, a tribal warrior (with a club) vs. a tribal hunter (with a simple bow). We'll assume both characters have every stat as 5. Both start with 25 HP (5 x their Max HP stat).

    Before they attack, they choose which skill to use (in this case, they both just know standard attacks with a base damage of 3).

    [Warrior rolls agility 2.]
    [Hunter rolls perception 3.]

    This round, the Warrior was slower, so the Hunter gets to attack first.

    Now, the hunter rolls their damage stat.

    [Hunter rolls dexterity 5]
    A direct hit. 5 x base damage 3 = 15 damage. The warrior takes 15 damage.

    Now it's the Warrior's chance to attack. He rolls his damage stat, which is strength.

    [Warrior rolls strength 1]
    The warrior doesn't get so lucky, his attack just sort of glances off the hunter. The hunter takes 3 damage.

    Now we move onto the next round.

    [Warrior rolls agility 1]
    [Hunter rolls perception 2]
    Again, the warrior is very unlucky. Because the hunter rolled a perception twice as high as his, the hunter gets to attack twice before he can.

    [Hunter rolls dexterity 1]
    The arrow barely grazes the warrior. 3 damage.
    [Hunter rolls dexterity 5]
    Direct hit. 15 damage. The hunter dies.


    That's the basic jist of the system.


    -Stamina (Max HP for your character. Or rather, every stamina point gives you 10 more HP. "Minor" enemies usually only get 5 for each point)
    -Willpower (Max MP + 10 for each point)
    -Strength
    -Perception
    -Agility
    -Stealth
    -Dexterity
    -Intelligence
    -Charisma

    You start out with 50 points (not sure if I'll keep that number, I might make it a little higher) to distribute among all of these stats (no stat can be lower than 1). In general, 5 is what an "average" (untrained) human is capable of. How many points is how many sides (plus one) your die has when that stat is rolled.
    For example, if you have an agility stat of 1, you basically flip a coin anytime agility is an issue. If it lands on 0, you can't move at all. If it lands on 1, you budge about a foot or so. If you have a speed stat of 5, you roll a six-sided die, which can land on anything from 0 to 5.

    As for combat: Each type of combat chooses one stat to be a "speed stat", another to be its "damage stat", and a third to be its "special stat" (which is basically a "magic attack"-type deal. It's also useful for more passive abilities).

    -Melee: This is everything from swordfighting to punching things. (Speed Stat: Agility, Damage Stat: Strength, Special Stat: Dexterity)
    -Magic: Spellcasting. (Speed Stat: Dexterity, Damage Stat: Intelligence, Special Stat: Perception)
    -Munitions: Ranged Weapons, including guns and bows. (Speed Stat: Perception, Damage Stat: Dexterity, Special Stat: Intelligence)
    -Monsters: Summoning creatures to aid us. Basically, this world's equivalent of a pokemon trainer. (I haven't worked out stats for this one yet.)

    When two opponents attack each other, each round you roll their speed stats against each other. For example, a tribal warrior (with a club) vs. a tribal hunter (with a simple bow). We'll assume both characters have every stat as 5. Both start with 25 HP (5 x their Max HP stat).

    Before they attack, they choose which skill to use (in this case, they both just know standard attacks with a base damage of 3).

    [Warrior rolls agility 2.]
    [Hunter rolls perception 3.]

    This round, the Warrior was slower, so the Hunter gets to attack first.

    Now, the hunter rolls their damage stat.

    [Hunter rolls dexterity 5]
    A direct hit. 5 x base damage 3 = 15 damage. The warrior takes 15 damage.

    Now it's the Warrior's chance to attack. He rolls his damage stat, which is strength.

    [Warrior rolls strength 1]
    The warrior doesn't get so lucky, his attack just sort of glances off the hunter. The hunter takes 3 damage.

    Now we move onto the next round.

    [Warrior rolls agility 1]
    [Hunter rolls perception 2]
    Again, the warrior is very unlucky. Because the hunter rolled a perception twice as high as his, the hunter gets to attack twice before he can.

    [Hunter rolls dexterity 1]
    The arrow barely grazes the warrior. 3 damage.
    [Hunter rolls dexterity 5]
    Direct hit. 15 damage. The hunter dies.


    That's the basic jist of the system.

    Zion is looking to expand into the eastern frontier!
    They've been handing out contracts to groups of settlers, in order to get them to form outposts.
    However, (as the fine print of the contracts states) the Eastern Frontier is not a very safe place. Zion is not responsible for any injuries that will probably occur while taming the land.

    In order to sign up, you need to create a character.

    Here's where you start:

    Stamina (determines HP):
    Willpower (determines MP):
    Strength:
    Agility:
    Intelligence:
    Dexterity:
    Charisma:
    Stealth:
    Perception:

    You have 54 points to distribute among these. No stat may be less than 1.
    Our characters will start out relatively weak, but grow as the RP goes on. For example, you might start out as a guy with a dagger or a wooden sword, and then upgrade until you're a Jedi by any other name.


    Name:
    Species:
    Alignment: (Lawful vs. Chaotic and Good vs. Evil)
    Occupation: (Keep in mind that non-combat roles help as well)
    Appearance:
    Elemental Bias: (Basically, it makes your character themed after that element)
    Stats:
    Equipment: (Why don't you tell me sort of what you're going for, here, and I'll try and help you?)
    Backstory:
    Personality: (Optional)

    A note on "Evil" Characters:
    The limit on how evil a player character can be is that their evil cannot be a direct threat to their fellow party members. They are allowed to support less-than-moral decisions on the part of the group, however, as well as commit less-than-righteous actions that don't hurt the party directly.
    For example: We come across a group of injured refugees. A Good character would suggest handing out resources to them. A Neutral character would politely suggest sending them on their way. An evil character would suggest that the party steals their stuff, since they're screwed anyways.
    This does work both ways-a good character has to tolerate at least a little bit of evil. You can't just kill someone because "Well, they're evil!". You are allowed to argue with them, however. In general, you should ask the GM before using physical force against a fellow party member.
     
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