Pussy Riot

Discussion in 'THREAD ARCHIVES' started by Acquariana, Aug 18, 2012.

  1. To sum up what/who they are for those of you who don't know, Pussy Riot is a group of Russian, feminist women who use their punk music and performances to protest. While the Russian public generally stands against them, they have managed to gain international support from such people/bands as Madonna, Björk, and Sting among several others. I find the group somewhat fascinating because they've done what so few groups do today: combine politics and art. Just yesterday the court sentenced three of the group's members to two years in prison for "hooliganism motivated by religious hatred." I have linked the act that supposedly warranted this charge below.

    [video=youtube;lPDkJbTQRCY]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lPDkJbTQRCY[/video]

    Full article for your reading pleasure

    I don't think the charge nor the sentence really fit what they did. They were protesting and didn't physically harm anyone in doing so. Sure, some of the conservative church-goers might've claimed to be "physically harmed" by their words and performance, but by that logic I could claim the same when I see the Westboro Baptist Church hatefully protesting at military funerals. Also, addressing the "motivated by religious hatred" part, yeah, there were parts like "shit, the Lord is shit" according to the translation, but most of the translated lines make it clear that the song is, first and foremost, a political statement.

    If you have one, what's your opinion on the group? Do you think that what they did was inappropriate? Why? Was the two year sentence too harsh?
     
  2. My question is we're they sentenced for the protest in and of its self, or because they entered the church? Because if I were a church head who supported the current leadership, I wouldn't want my place of worship used by a protest group and would be doing everything in my sphear of influence to get the arrested and charged.

    Was their actions political protest, sure, but did they knowingly break the law too? Possibly, and maybe that's okay if they're willing to stand up for their beliefs and be a two year martyr for their cause. I don't know enough about Russian politics nor the Orthodox Church nor the quality of the prisons.
     
  3. There's some of this I agree with and some that I don't.
    Oddly, Putin is fairly relaxed about the whole thing and is hoping for leniency in their case, though he says he leaves it up to the court.
    They claim to not have intended to show religious hatred and were rather trying to make a statement about Putin and Patriarch Kirill (hence why they chose the church to protest) who supports him, saying things such as that Putin is a “miracle from God” . I think that this was a purely political statement that ended up being not as well thought-out as it could have been, since it appeared to be religious hatred, even if it wasn't meant to be.

    I do think the most amusing part, again, is that Putin has statements where he expresses a hope that they are treated leniently. And they were given a smaller sentence than expected, I believe. Two instead of seven.
     
  4. @Ocha: That's actually a good question. I'm guessing probably both, though the charge would seem to imply the latter.

    If you care to know, Putin's been around . . . for awhile. He was Prime Minister from 1999 to 2000, served as president from 2000 to 2008, served again as Prime Minister from 2008 to 2012, and was again elected as President this year. Moving along, there are some positive aspects of his presidency/time as prime minister. For example, Russia has lowered its crime rates and improved its economy significantly while he's been in control. Further, the people apparently approve highly of him, but some would like to argue that the state-run television has an influence on the people's views of their gov't. However, treatment of women in Russia remains an issue. (Job discrimination, spousal abuse, lack of political power, dress codes, etc.)

    Though I don't know a ton about the Orthodox Church, I do know that they are generally quite conservative in regards to social issues. Further, Putin has managed go gain support from them.

    Whee, sources:
    http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/484357/Vladimir-Putin

    http://ukinrussia.fco.gov.uk/en/news/?view=News&id=560748782

    http://www.undp.ru/Gender_MDG_eng.pdf


    @Kitti: I found that kind of amusing in an odd way, as well. Also, I would agree with the idea that it was a political statement that just came out the wrong way.