EXERCISE Creating Holidays #1: Seasons!

Discussion in 'DEVELOPING CHARACTERS & CULTURES' started by Minibit, Aug 16, 2013.

  1. Inspired by Diana's thread about the mindset of characters during holidays!

    This is going to be a series of exercises on creating holidays; I don't know how many I'll put up but let's have some fun with it, shall we?

    A SEASONAL HOLIDAY

    Create a holiday whose purpose is to celebrate a season: you can use the form below or free-write.

    Don't be afraid to get creative: You don't have to stick with Summer, Fall, Winter, and Spring for seasons, you could invent your own! Try to avoid copying established holidays in our world; be unique and remember that anything that becomes tradition stops looking silly after a while. Saying that your holiday is celebrated by wearing bells on your clothes and playing songs with different kinds of bells seems weird until you consider that every year we dress our kids (and ourselves!) up in costumes and send them to other people's houses to ask for candy. DO NOT FEAR THE WEIRD.


    Holiday Name:
    When is it celebrated?
    Who celebrates?
    What is done to celebrate?
    How old is this holiday?
    Has this holiday changed much from its roots?
    Where do the festivities take place?
    Is there anything it is taboo to do on this holiday?
    Do people dress differently for this holiday?
    Is any kind of decoration traditional?
    Are any colours, symbols, or icons associated with this holiday?
    Are any spirits or deities associated with this holiday?
    Is it an important/widespread celebration, or a smaller affair?

    Are any foods or drinks associated with this holiday?
    Do any natural events coincide with this holiday (ie: an eclipse)?
    Does it celebrate the end of a season? The beginning? The mid-point?
    Which season?


    Other Creating Holidays Exercises:

    Seasons!
    Death!
    Food!
    Protection!
    Costumes!
    Travel!
    Animals!
    Time!
    Parents!
    Invention!
    Gifts!
    Inebriation!
    Superstition!
    Religion!
    Miracles!
    Birthdays!
    Manliness!
    Games!
    The Future!
    Purification!

    Flowers!
     
    #1 Minibit, Aug 16, 2013
    Last edited: Sep 24, 2014
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  2. Holiday Name: The Rain Dance Festival
    When? The start of the rainy season, typically late spring or early summer, during and directly after the first major storm.
    Does it celebrate the end of a season? The beginning? The mid-point? The beginning.
    Which season? Rainy season.
    What is done to celebrate?
    Are celebrations usually done at a certain time of day? The celebrations tend to pick up at night, since the storms typically get less powerful without the energy of sunlight.
    In a certain setting? If the weather is mild enough, on the beach. If not, clearings and pavillions across the island host the celebrations and dances.
    Is it a big holiday? Yes, it's expected that everyone attend. It's considered very rude to decline an invitation on the islands, and no one wants the storm maids to feel as though they've been snubbed.
    Is there traditional dress code? Anything that permits dancing is acceptable; the economic status of the guests generally determines how fancy the dancing garb may be.
    How old is this holiday? Could you be considered old-fashioned if you celebrate it? Ever since humanity settled on the Keimiche Archipelago, there have been some sort of parties thrown for the storm maids. It is still widely celebrated among the natives, though continentals usually attend for the free alcohol or not at all.
    Has it changed much from it's roots? Depending on the region, not too much. Where the continentals have more influence, the celebration tends to involve more alcohol, less dancing, and indoors activity.
    Is there any supernatural events associated with this holiday? It's rumored that the storm maid herself will visit the best party for her, and usually destroy it by drunken dancing, so it is traditional to attempt to throw the second-best celebration for fear of a hurricane spirit showing up and destroying everything by accident.
    Is the holiday dedicated to any spirits or deities? Is it associated in any way with the worship of spirits or deities? It is dedicated to the first storm of the season. Keimiche natives believe each storm is caused by the dancing of a spirit, and it is in her honor that the parties are thrown, as they are said to be pleased by dancing and having a good time, and will not cause much damage but drop plenty of life-giving fresh water when pleased. If displeased, destructive hurricanes or drought will surely follow. Worship isn't exactly the right word, for the storm maids are treated with respect but not awe, and the offering is more of a bribe than a gift.
     
  3. Holiday Name: Iruendo shi Ayrun (Festival of Light)

    When? When counting in "normal" seasons it is generally early/middle summer.

    Does it celebrate the end of a season? The beginning? The mid-point? The end of the Dark Cycle and the beginning of the Light.

    Which season? Light Cycle

    What is done to celebrate? There is a large feast in the afternoon in the large square, open fires are kept burning to spread some warmth, the long procedure of cooking the food and preparing the square are also counted as part of the celebrartion. Everyone eats together instead of between familes like usual and after it is done there are time for some quiet time of praying to the Gods or walking through the gardens with friends or lovers and children plays. When night is settling under a low standing sun that will continue to rise higher until the next Dark Cycle everyone gathers around the fires to dance and drink the rare wine Tueru, it can only be made with special berries that can only be made during this time of the year.

    Are celebrations usually done at a certain time of day? The real part of the festival takes place during the sun kissed evening and night but every lokal considers the day long preparations as a part of the festival.

    In a certain setting? Even if the cities where it is held differ in design the festival is mainly held in the main square and the gardens nearby, decorated and lit up by lanterns it transforms the harsh winter landscape to a warm and inviting place.

    Is it a big holiday? (eg: a statutory holiday, one everyone from every walk of life observes) or more of a small-town/working-class only one? Maybe it's a posh holiday usually celebrated on Snob Hill. It is very big among the lokals, people of every age and status help with preparations and attending the festiveties.

    Is there traditional dress code? Anything is fine but almost everyone takes on their best clothes and accesories, it is the end of a long dark winter so everyone enjoys dressing up and inviting the sun.

    How old is this holiday? Could you be considered old-fashioned if you celebrate it? It has been around ever since the Zith'ogana first inhabited Brichana but it has steadily grown from a small celebration to a large communal festival and it even brings in tourists that brave the harsh tundra just to experience the unique celebration.

    Has it changed much from it's roots? Both yes and no, the essentials are the same but it has grown in size and compared to the beginning of the traditions everything from preparations and celebrating are done by everyone working together in a communal style.

    Is there any supernatural events associated with this holiday? Other than the hopes for the Deities help in the coming Cycle the festivities are not associated with any kind of magic or supernatural events.

    Is the holiday dedicated to any spirits or deities? Is it associated in any way with the worship of spirits or deities? No, although the three deities Ghania, Kadya and Priume are often given gifts and offerings at their temples for hunting luck, giving thanks for surviving the winter and for continuous strength. It is individual rather than an addition in the festival.
     
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  4. Holiday Name: Petal Fall

    When is it celebrated: The first day of Summer every year, marked by the strong winds blowing through the singing forest and causing the petals of the flowers that later turn into the song stopper fruits dislodge and blow through the forest in a beautiful storm of swirling red petals.

    Who celebrates: The residents of the town Owl's Perch, which resides south of the forest. The winds blow south, so when the petals are carried from the forest they right into the town, filling it with the small beautiful red petals.

    What is done to celebrate: Residents gather and go on a hunt for the petals, at the end of the day the ten people with the most win simple prizes such as free meals at the more expensive places to eat, money to use in the stores, or things like rare flowers, or items like shells from the under water city Araria.

    How old is this holiday: As the town itself has only been around for about fifty years, the holiday has been around that long as well, the winds first blew the petals in when the town was being built and many saw it as a sign of good fortune for the future of the city.

    Has this holiday changed much from its roots: It has in a few ways, prizes did not used to be given, the petals used to be left around town to blow away on their own time but the residents of the town decided to make it into a game.

    Is there anything it is taboo to do on this holiday: Not really, it's just a minor one for fun, and for an excuse for school to be let out temporarily.

    Do people dress differently for this holiday: Some do, many people wear the same shade of red as the petals, believing it will give them better luck.

    Is any kind of decoration traditional: No, the petals themselves provide decoration.

    Are any colors, symbols, or icons associated with this holiday: The deep reds of the petals yes, but that is really it.

    Are any foods or drinks associated with this holiday: Not usually, but some people have taken to dipping the petals into batter and cooking them or just eating them as they are, as they have a sweet smell and taste.


     
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