EXERCISE Brainstorming: Using Tarot Cards

Discussion in 'REFINING WRITING' started by Diana, Aug 9, 2014.

  1. If you are looking for ways to brainstorm up ideas for characters, plots, or things in general TAROT CARDS can be a useful and fun tool.

    Every Tarot card comes with a list of basic traits, symbolism, and often even a little story about the card's origins or meanings.

    For Characters
    You can draw a card to represent their personality, their history, their flaws, or their story.

    For Plots
    Tarot cards can easily represent a problem or journey that must be resolved in your story.


    Your exercise is to randomly select 3 tarot cards. Use those cards to create a character OR create a plot.

    Some Useful Links:
     
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  2. CARD no.1: The Nine of Cups

    CARD no.2: The High Priestess

    CARD no.3: The King of Wands​
    RESULT:
    Meet Dylan Reasce.

    Traveler.
    Reveler.
    Autocrat.

    Many thought that young Dylan would grow into a businessman or a lawyer. Perhaps a Doctor, even. He was a responsible young lad; he always did what he was told and rarely told a lie. At least... to his parents' knowledge. The boy constantly sought out ways to help others, and was often considered the teacher's pet in school. He was lucky, then, that he never stayed in any single school for long. With a father who ran a growing hotel chain and a popular travel agency, the family was periodically displaced. By staying at his own hotels, not only did he save money, but he built trust with his patrons. He could tell them - from experience - what staying in each building was like and what each location uniquely had to offer. Dylan looked up to his father because despite the fact that he rarely got to see him for longer than a few minutes at a time, the man was always smiling.

    But, time passed and Dylan grew. He became aware of the fact that whether or not his father was smiling or frowning - laughing or crying - he was nothing more than a total ass. As a child, he didn't get it. He couldn't understand his sarcasm or decipher his underhanded tactics. He was never around to see him when he laid a hand on his mother or to hear him when he raised his voice. The man wasn't traveling to strengthen his bond with the people; he was traveling to sate his unsavory habits. From this realization onward, the disappointment and anger took over and Dylan came to no longer be the picture perfect son. Unfortunately, that was soon all he knew.

    It was no surprise, then, that the boy wound up just like his father. From the very moment he was old enough to be held responsible for his own actions - before then even, though he was only brought back to face punishment - Dylan lived to party. As the sole beneficiary of his father's estate - his mother had long left him at that point - the rambunctious lad had no sense of responsibility. Having had everything handed to him on a silver platter, he sought fulfillment in no way other than through carousal. It seemed that his boyhood full of good deeds had come around two-fold to leave him in the lap of luxury. It was only unfortunate that he was taking advantage of it in all the wrong ways.

    With his father's company, he was able to continue travelling, sampling bars, brothels, casinos, and all other forms of dicey amusement. Dylan could get on just about anyone's good side with his presence and winning smile. He knew what he wanted and he knew how to get it. Those who didn't see things his way were not worth his time. Still, brief glimpses of his young self found their way to peek through on occasion. He would selflessly offer his assistance or donations to most who asked (within reason). Always taking far too long to decide on matters of even minimal importance - and often making the wrong decision as a result of overthinking - he forgot just how sharp his natural instincts were; he'd forgotten how to listen to his inner voice.
     
    #2 Nogyseo, Aug 27, 2014
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 27, 2014
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