INTEREST CHECK A soldiers RP

Discussion in 'THREAD ARCHIVES' started by Tenchi-Roku, Dec 8, 2011.

  1. For a while now, I've had my mind on nothing but guns, tamks, soldiers, and epic feats of life and death. Some of us here love constant action and dramatic moments of last standing soldiers in the heat of battle. So I thought why not make an RP about soldiers that set their lives on the line, driving their way through the enemy and leaving the perminant mark of honor and dedication. Thee story will be made up, and organization of build up, rules, etc will require assistance. So what do you think? :D
     
  2. I think it's a grand idea! Seems very enjoyable ^.^ I would like to join, but I fear I am not well versed on all the lingo and such >.<
     
  3. I would be game. I'm fairly well versed in how the military works, so...
     
  4. cool :D
    Any ideas on a plot, I might have a few but I'm still thinking them throught :T
     
  5. I'm in on this, but we do have to figure which war, time period, and against whom. Then again i have to try to get my batman rp goin.
     
  6. I'll join! ..though... are we focusing on the Army or the entire Military? >> Hince: "soldiers" refer to the guys in the Army. ...reason I'm wondering.

    Besides my question, sounds like a good RP could come out of this.
    But yes. We do need dates, times, who we're against..etc.
    I can help out on getting history and facts if we're going to do a war that has actually happened, ((ex: World War II))

    If we make up our own wars I can also provide information on how the branches of the Military work, which do which, etc.... (lots of stereotyped on some branches..)

    *Military brat* ...
     
  7. We Were Soldiers/Saving Private Ryan or Starship Troopers?

    AKA whats going to be your portrayal of war, gun ho action or gritty realism?
     
  8. It's gunna be more like a Battlefield 3/Battle Los Angelus/saving Private Ryan kind of RP.

    I'm looking for it be more of that action packed, dramatic gains and losses, and yes the gun ho action >:D. With alittle bit of the gritty realizm.

    Our enemy is a combination between the Korean Special Forces, Spetsnaz(or Soviet Union), and Taliban Forces.

    Coalition choices vary between the following:
    U.S. Army Rangers
    Marines/ U.S.M.C
    American Special Forces
    Navy Seals
    P.M.C
    Task Force(Number will be notified)
    S.A.S
    etc

    I'll wait for the information that loveless can provide before thinking of a plot :P
     
  9. Information for which part? ...the branches or the wars? ...I'm guessing branches, but I want to make sure. >>
     
  10. I'll require sorta both, if you have the time :T

    That way I can distribute whether we'll use multiple coalitions or just one group.
     
  11. I was thinking about being an Airforce kid myself.
     
  12. Ooooh good idea Sir Basil :3
     
  13. Exactly what I'm going for, Basil. ;3


    And I'll get all the information up for the weekend...hopefully before Monday...I have a lot of shit going on this weekend though.. Monday night, maybe... ... I'll work on it.
     
  14. Thats cool, I've got exams so I'll be busy too. Whenever you can is ok with me Loveless, I don't want anybody to stress themselves over it XD
     
  15. Today's Military:

    ARMY

    As the oldest branch of the U.S. Military, founded in 1775, the Army is one of the most powerful fighting forces on earth. Approximately 549,015 full-time Soldiers in today’s Army defend and serve our nation by land, sea and air. Elite groups within the Army, such as the Army Rangers and Special Forces, receive specialized training for advanced combat situations.In addition to domestic bases, the Army has permanent stations in Asia, Europe and the Middle East, as well as troops on the ground wherever there is a conflict. Length of individual service commitment varies, and in some cases may be as little as two years.
    BEFORE SERVING IN THE ARMY

    To enlist in the U.S. Army, you must be between 18 and 42 years old (17 with parental consent). You must be a U.S. citizen or resident alien. A high school diploma is preferred, but a high school equivalent such as the GED may be accepted. You must also pass the ASVAB test and a physical fitness exam.To serve in the Army, recruits must complete 10 weeks of Basic Combat Training, commonly known as boot camp. Eligible college students can participate in their school’s ROTC program or attend a military academy to enter the Army as officers after graduation.See more entrance requirements
    ARMY BENEFITS

    A competitive salary is just one of the benefits of Army service. All Soldiers receive health care, housing and food allowances, and educational opportunities. After 20 years of service, retirement pay is guaranteed as well. On top of that, there are special pays for everything from deployment to medical training, depending on your job and location.
    ARMY CAREERS

    The Army offers hundreds of career opportunities across various disciplines, from aviation to information technology to Special Forces. No matter what your specialty is, you’ll receive top-notch training and the experience to handle whatever comes your way. It’s no surprise that civilian employers often favor Army veterans for crucial positions.


    ARMY RESERVE

    The Army Reserve offers citizens the opportunity to serve near home until they are needed to deploy. Reserve Soldiers receive the same training as active-duty Soldiers. After Basic Combat Training (BCT) and Advanced Individual Training (AIT), Reserve Soldiers return to their civilian lives and spend one weekend a month drilling to keep their skills sharp. For roughly two weeks a year, Reserve Soldiers serve on Active Duty, focusing on challenging field and specialty training. They may even have the opportunity to attend competitive Army training programs such as Airborne and Air Assault schools. Reserve Soldiers may be called to Active Duty when needed.Today’s Army Reserve is 205,297 troops strong. Service options for the Army Reserve range from three to six years.
    BEFORE SERVING IN THE ARMY RESERVE

    To enlist in the U.S. Army Reserve, you must be between 18 and 40 years old (17 with parental consent). You must be a U.S. citizen or resident alien. A high school diploma is preferred, but a high school equivalent such as theGED may be accepted. You must also pass the ASVABtest and a physical fitness exam.All Reserve Soldiers must complete 10 weeks of Basic Combat Training, the same boot camp attended by full-time Army Soldiers.See more entrance requirements
    ARMY RESERVE BENEFITS

    The Army Reserve offers many of the same benefits as the full-time Army, including fair pay for all time spent training or deployed. Reserve Soldiers develop skills and confidence, working as a team toward a larger goal. There are few experiences that have such lasting impact.
    ARMY RESERVE CAREERS

    The Army Reserve can be a great way to develop career skills and serve our nation while maintaining a civilian career. More than 120 Reserve jobs are available for qualified applicants.


    ARMY NATIONAL GUARD

    Like the Army Reserve, the Army National Guard is made up of Citizen-Soldiers who train part time, close to home, until needed. Since 1636, each state has had its own militia. These became the foundation of today’s Guard units (this was mandated by the Constitution in 1787). The Guard mobilizes to protect U.S. domestic interests in times of conflict or natural disaster, and may be deployed internationally alongside full-time troops when the situation demands. Today’s National Guard consists of approximately 358,391 troops from all U.S. states and territories.
    BEFORE SERVING IN THE ARMY NATIONAL GUARD

    To enlist in the Army National Guard you must be between 18 and 42 years old (17 with parental consent). You must be a U.S. citizen or resident alien. A high school diploma is preferred, but a high school equivalent such as theGED may also be accepted. You must also pass theASVAB test and a physical fitness exam.All National Guard members must complete 10 weeks of Basic Combat Training, the same boot camp attended by full-time Army Soldiers.See more entrance requirements
    ARMY NATIONAL GUARD BENEFITS

    Members of the Army National Guard are fairly compensated for all hours spent training, drilling or deployed. The Guard allows members to train close to home while maintaining civilian careers. This provides valuable experience that benefits individuals at home and while serving.
    ARMY NATIONAL GUARD CAREERS

    National Guard training is highly prized by civilian employers. Add qualities like dedication and responsibility to this training, and you have a compelling mix of traits that employers look for. Whether a servicemember’s job in the Guard mirrors or complements his or her civilian career, time spent serving is a valuable asset.
     
  16. Today's Military

    MARINE CORPS

    The United States Marine Corps was founded in 1775, even before our nation was officially formed. This elite group of men and women live by a strict code of integrity and ethics, producing not just strong warriors but people of exceptional character. The core values of Honor, Courage and Commitment influence everything a Marine does, on and off the battlefield.The Marine Corps plays a major role as the first force on the ground in most conflicts. Today, 203,075 Marines are stationed around the world at all times, ready to deploy quickly whenever and wherever needed. The minimum service commitment for the Marine Corps is four years, but as the saying goes “There are no retired Marines, only former Marines”.

    BEFORE SERVING IN THE MARINE CORPS

    To join the Marine Corps an individual must be between 18 and 29 years old (17 with parental consent) and have a high school diploma. A small percentage of GED holders are allowed to join each year, provided they score well on the ASVAB test. College students wishing to train for Marine Corps officer positions may enroll in their school’s Navy ROTC program, and should visit their local Officer Selection Office (OSO) for information.All Marine Corps members undergo 12 weeks of Basic Training at Parris Island, S.C., or San Diego, Calif. This training is an intense mental and physical process that molds recruits to uphold and live by the core Marine Corps values of Honor, Courage and Commitment. Only the most elite make it through, and those who qualify have earned the right to wear the uniform.See more entrance requirements
    MARINE CORPS BENEFITS

    The Marine Corps is unique among Service branches in the focus on its intangible benefits. Yes, Marines are paid well and receive the same healthcare and lifestyle benefits as other servicemembers, but being a Marine is not simply a job. It is a calling, and those who qualify have earned the right to wear the uniform.
    MARINE CORPS CAREERS

    A Marine is, above all else, a Marine. As part of the world’s most elite fighting force, a Marine is primarily a warrior, skilled in the art of warfare. Still, Marines hold themselves to the highest Corps standards no matter what they’re doing. These career profiles are just a few examples of the work done by today’s Marines.Explore career profiles
    Post-military careers


    MARINE CORPS RESERVE


    The Marine Corps Reserve differs from other reserve branches in that it is made up primarily of Marines formerly on Active Duty. There is practically no such thing as being a “retired” Marine – the commitment is 24/7, and for life. The Reserve, therefore, is a means for Marines to continue serving after leaving Active Duty, training at a unit or school close to home until they are called upon.
    BEFORE SERVING IN THE MARINE CORPS RESERVE

    To join the Marine Corps Reserve an individual must be between 18 and 28 years old (17 with parental consent) and have a high school diploma. A small percentage of GED holders are allowed to join each year, provided they score well on the ASVAB test. College students wishing to train for Marine Corps officer positions may enroll in their school’s Navy ROTC program, and should visit their local Officer Selection Office (OSO) for information.All Marine Corps members undergo 12 weeks of Basic Training at Parris Island, S.C., or San Diego, Calif. This training is an intense mental and physical process that shapes recruits against the core Marine Corps values of Honor, Courage and Commitment. Only the most elite make it through, and that’s just the way the Marines like it.See more entrance requirements
    MARINE CORPS RESERVE BENEFITS

    The Marine Corps is unique among service branches in the intensity of its intangible benefits. Yes, Marines are paid well and receive the same health care and lifestyle benefits as other servicemembers. But being a Marine is not simply a job. It is a calling, and those who qualify have earned the right to wear the uniform.
    MARINE CORPS RESERVE CAREERS

    A Marine is, above all else, a Marine. As part of the world’s most elite group of warriors, individual jobs take a backseat to the code of ethics that unites this force. Still, Marine training is among the best, and individuals must have the sharpest skills to perform up to Corps standards.Explore career profiles
    Post-military careers
     
  17. Thanks for the information. I'm sure this will help lots of people out.
    Most of my military knowledge comes from military history, or my friends in the service.
     
  18. Today's Military

    NAVY

    The U.S. Navy was founded under the authority of George Washington in 1775, with the intent to intercept British supply ships near Massachusetts. Despite success in battle during the American Revolution, a standing Navy was considered too large an expense for more than a decade. But, in 1794, pirate attacks on trade routes and increasing international conflicts cemented the importance of a strong Navy. Thus began the force that, to this day, protects U.S. interests at home and abroad.
    Currently comprised of 324,239 personnel, today’s Navy is equipped to handle operations both on and under the sea, in the air and on the ground. Its reach is worldwide, spanning 100 international ports and touching the farthest corners of the open ocean. Elite groups within the Navy, such as theSEALS and Navy Divers, receive specialized training for advanced warfare situations. A Navy Sailor generally serves a term of four years aboard one of the Navy’s 283 deployable ships, though options for shorter time commitments exist.
    BEFORE SERVING IN THE NAVY

    To join the U.S. Navy you must be between 18 and 34 years old (or 17 years old with parental consent). A high school diploma is preferred, but a high school equivalent such as the GED may also be accepted. All Navy recruits must take the ASVAB test to determine placement within the Service. Interested college students are encouraged to investigate the Navy ROTCprogram.Navy training begins with eight weeks of Boot Camp at Recruit Training Command in Great Lakes, Ill. Rigorous physical and classroom exercises transform civilians into Sailors and prepare them for their first tour of duty.See more entrance requirements
    NAVY BENEFITS

    Yes, the Navy provides a regular salary, health care and occupational training to all its members, plus additional pay for eligible specialists, such as Aviators, divers and submariners. But the benefits don’t stop there. From educational support, to 30 days vacation, to extensive travel in exotic places, the Navy has more benefits than meet the eye.
    NAVY CAREERS

    Today’s Navy is a high-tech organization with hundreds of possible career paths. You might picture yourself aboard aircraft carriers and submarines, but you’re just as likely to spend your days at a computer monitoring nuclear power or in the cockpit of an F/A-18 Super Hornet jet. Find your place among the sailors, scientists, artists and aviators who call the Navy home.Explore career profiles
    Post-military careers


    NAVY RESERVE

    The Navy Reserve is a valued partner of the Navy’s active-duty department. It offers citizens the chance to serve on a part-time basis, training near home until called to Active Duty. A reservist can pursue a full-time civilian education or obtain special military training while serving.
    Today, the Navy Reserve comprises more than 20 percent of total Navy assets and, when called to action, can be found abroad, on shore, in the air or at sea. The Navy Reserve’s involvement with the Navy continues to grow. Currently, 119,307 Navy Reservists stand by to join the fleet when needed as active parts of the largest and most powerful naval force in the world.
    BEFORE SERVING IN THE NAVY RESERVE

    To join the U.S. Navy Reserve you must be between 18 and 39 years old (exceptions can be made for those with prior service). You must also pass a physical exam and have a high school diploma. Although, in rare instances,GED certificates can be accepted. For individuals with Prior Service, your physical is very important when reaffiliating with the Navy Reserve. All enlisted Navy reservists must take the ASVAB test to determine placement within the Service.Navy Reserve training, like full-time Navy training, begins with eight weeks of Boot Camp at Recruit Training Command in Great Lakes, Ill.See more entrance requirements
    NAVY RESERVE BENEFITS

    The Navy Reserve provides a flexible opportunity to serve while maintaining a civilian career. In addition to regular pay for all time spent training and deployed, a member of the Navy Reserve receives top-of-the-line job training, travel benefits and even college credits for certain experiences.
    NAVY RESERVE CAREERS

    Time in the Navy Reserve can provide valuable career skills that apply directly to the civilian world. Navy reservists work with the latest technology under high pressure – training many employers value and seek out. Whether a reservist performs duties similar to his or her civilian job or something entirely different, military training can make a huge impact on career success.Explore career profiles
    Post-military careers
     
  19. Today's Military

    AIR FORCE

    The Air Force began as a subdivision of the U.S. Army and was declared an official combatant arm in 1920. It wasn’t until 1947, following World War II, that the Air Force was recognized as its own military branch.Today’s Air Force operates in keeping with a three-part vision: global vigilance, reach and power. This vision empowers a technologically advanced force of 328,847 troops focused on air, space and cyberspace superiority.
    BEFORE SERVING IN THE AIR FORCE

    To join the Air Force, you must be between 18 and 27 years old, or 17 with parental consent. While exceptions are sometimes made for candidates with GEDs or other high school equivalents, high school diplomas are preferred. As in most Service branches, the ASVAB test is used to match recruits with jobs. Officer candidates are required to take the Air Force Officer Qualifying Test (AFOQT). Qualified college students wishing to train as officers should consider Air Force ROTC.All Air Force recruits spend 8.5 weeks in Basic Military Training at Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio, Texas. During this time, trainees develop the discipline, confidence and skills to grow into Airmen.See more entrance requirements
    AIR FORCE BENEFITS

    A good salary, full health benefits and a fulfilling career – could you ask for more? For the right person, the Air Force can be a very rewarding experience, and not all of the benefits are as tangible as those listed here. Explore how compensation combines with travel, character-building experiences and more to make the Air Force experience unique.
    AIR FORCE CAREERS

    The Air Force provides advanced, hands-on training for hundreds of careers. Pilots and flight crew are just the tip of the iceberg. The Air Force relies on mechanics, electronics technicians, air traffic controllers, medical staff and other personnel to fulfill its objectives. Find out which Air Force opportunities are right for you.Explore career profiles
    Post-military careers


    AIR FORCE RESERVE

    The Air Force Reserve is an integral part of our country’s dominant presence in air and space. With readiness as its primary charge, the Air Force Reserve contributes daily to the Air Force mission and is actively involved in Air Force operations around the world.The Air Force Reserve currently employs 67,986 trained reservists. Though this makes up 21 percent of the Air Force’s overall manpower, the extent of their contribution is much greater. More than 20 percent of all Air Force missions are accomplished through the efforts of Air Force reservists.
    BEFORE SERVING IN THE AIR FORCE RESERVE

    To join the Air Force Reserve, you must be between 18 and 34 years old, or 17 with parental consent. While exceptions are sometimes made for candidates with GEDs or other high school equivalents, high school diplomas are preferred. As in most service branches, the ASVAB test is used to match recruits with jobs.As with full-time Air Force recruits, Reservists spend 8.5 weeks in Basic Military Training at Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio, Texas. During this time, trainees develop the discipline, confidence and skills to grow into Airmen.See more entrance requirements
    AIR FORCE RESERVE BENEFITS

    The Air Force Reserve offers many of the same benefits as active-duty Air Force, with the flexibility to train near home and maintain a civilian career until needed. Reservists are paid for all time spent drilling and deployed and have access to the same professional training as full-time servicemembers. Plus, few people see as much of the world as professional Airmen!
    AIR FORCE RESERVE CAREERS

    While many commercial pilots begin their careers in the Air Force, an in-flight job is just one facet of training a servicemember might receive in the Air Force Reserve. From telecommunications to ordnance disposal, Air Force reservists develop valuable skills and character that civilian employers find very desirable.Explore career profiles
    Post-military careers


    AIR NATIONAL GUARD

    The Air National Guard was made an official component of the U.S. Air Force in 1947, following the great aerial battles of World War II. Like the Air Force Reserve, the Air National Guard is made up of Citizen-Airmen who train part time, close to home, until called upon for duty. These professionals are civilians in peace and Airmen in war – helping the U.S. Air Force guard America’s skies.Today the Air National Guard is an essential component of the U.S. Air Force. Currently, this Force is made up of 109,196 Air National Guard personnel. There are more than 140 Air National Guard units throughout the U.S. and its territories with varying service options for a Guardsman to choose from.
    BEFORE SERVING IN THE AIR NATIONAL GUARD

    To join the Air National Guard, you must be between 18 and 34 years old, or 17 with parental consent. While exceptions are sometimes made for candidates with GEDs or other high school equivalents, high school diplomas are preferred. As in most Service branches, the ASVAB test is used to match recruits with jobs.As with full-time Air Force recruits, Air National Guard members spend 8.5 weeks in Basic Military Training at Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio, Texas. During this time, trainees develop the discipline, confidence and skills to grow into Airmen.See more entrance requirements
    AIR NATIONAL GUARD BENEFITS

    The Air National Guard offers many of the same benefits as the active-duty Air Force, with the flexibility to train near home and maintain a civilian career until needed. A Guard member is paid for all time spent drilling and deployed and has access to the same professional training as full-time servicemembers.
    AIR NATIONAL GUARD CAREERS

    While many commercial pilots begin their careers in the Air Force, an in-flight job is just one facet of training a servicemember might receive in the Air National Guard. From telecommunications to ordnance disposal, Air National Guard members develop valuable skills and character that civilian employers find very desirable.Explore career profiles
    Post-military careers
     
  20. Today's Military

    COAST GUARD

    The Coast Guard is an amalgamation of formerly distinct federal services: the U.S. Lighthouse Service, the Revenue Cutter Service, the Steamboat Inspection Service and the U.S. Lifesaving Service. In 1915, a congressional act combined the Life-Saving Service and Revenue Cutter Service to form the Coast Guard. The Service was placed under the control of the Treasury Department until 1967, when an executive order transferred the Coast Guard to the newly formed Department of Transportation.The smallest branch of today’s military, the Coast Guard operates under the Department of Homeland Security during peacetime and under the Navy during wartime, or by special presidential order. In addition to protecting our nation’s waterways, the 42,426 active-duty members of the Coast Guard perform search and rescue, law enforcement and environmental cleanup operations.
    BEFORE SERVING IN THE COAST GUARD

    To join the Coast Guard you must be a U.S. citizen or resident alien between 18 and 27 years old (or 17 with parental consent). While GEDs are sometimes accepted, high school diplomas are preferred. All recruits take the ASVAB test to determine placement. Those interested in becoming officers may apply to the Coast Guard Academy or talk to their local recruiter about other options.Basic Training takes place at the Coast Guard Training Center in Cape May, N.J., and lasts for eight weeks. Daily fitness and swimming drills combined with classroom instruction prepare recruits mentally and physically for life in the Coast Guard.See more entrance requirements
    COAST GUARD BENEFITS

    All Coast Guard members receive salaries and full health benefits, as well as opportunities for tuition reimbursement. In addition, the Coast Guard has obvious benefits for those who love the water. Combine travel, career training and strength of character to see why the Coast Guard can be so rewarding.
    COAST GUARD CAREERS

    The Coast Guard offers a range of opportunities for all sorts of interests. The Coast Guard is a great place for professionals in the marine and environmental sciences, offering access to the latest technology and research initiatives. In addition, the Coast Guard offers strong careers in law enforcement and mechanical engineering.Explore career profiles
    Post-military careers


    COAST GUARD RESERVE

    The Coast Guard Reserve offers citizens the opportunity to serve on a part-time basis, while still serving their country and community. Reservists take part in maritime safety, mobility, security, national defense and the protection of natural resources.Today, 7,693 Coast Guard reservists support and aid critical Coast Guard missions. Coast Guard reservists spend an average of one weekend a month and two weeks a year performing duties vital to our nation’s security.
    BEFORE SERVING IN THE COAST GUARD RESERVE

    To join the Coast Guard Reserve you must be a U.S. citizen or resident alien between 18 and 39 years old (or 17 with parental consent). While GEDs are sometimes accepted, high school diplomas are preferred. All recruits take the ASVAB test to determine placement.Coast Guard Reservists undergo Basic Training at the Coast Guard Training Center in Cape May, N.J., for eight weeks. Reservists also train one weekend per month and two weeks every summer.See more entrance requirements
    COAST GUARD RESERVE BENEFITS

    Members of the Coast Guard Reserve are paid for all time spent training or deployed. In addition, they receive most of the same benefits as full-time Coast Guard members, including tuition support, training and plenty of time on the water. Combine travel, career training and strength of character to see why the Coast Guard can be so rewarding.
    COAST GUARD CAREERS

    The Coast Guard Reserve needs members with all kinds of skills – including some you may already have. Whether you fill a position similar to your civilian job or learn a new professional skill, the Coast Guard will leave you better trained and more employable for the future.Explore career profiles
    Post-military careers